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Overview

Model # 10730 Store SKU # 1001017964

To be used with 5-in x 5-in square post . Supports loads up to 5,000 lb., 4,781 lb. of pull-off force and 1,641 lb. of side thrust. It's an excellent and cost-effective replacement to concrete sonotubes. Buried more than 42 in in the ground, below freezing depth. Resistant, sturdy and easy to install. Baked powder coating finish provides excellent resistance to rust.

  1. Can support up to 5,000 pounds
  1. Resist heaving
  1. Resist sinking
  1. No concrete needed
  1. Easy to install
  1. Durable baked powder coating finish

Specifications


Material

Aluminum


Colour Family

Black


Type

Foundation Screw

Dimensions

Assembled Depth (in inches)
6
Assembled Height (in inches)
56
Assembled Weight (in lbs)
23.50
Assembled Width (in inches)
6
Packaged Depth (in inches)
6
Packaged Height (in inches)
56
Packaged Weight (In lbs)
23.5
Packaged Width (in inches)
6

Details

Colour Family
Black
Country of Origin
CN-China
Material
Aluminum
Type
Foundation Screw

Warranty / Certifications

5-year satisfaction warranty, For more information please visit www.pylex.com
Commercial 66 Foundation ScrewPylex Commercial 66 Foundation ScrewTo be used with 5-in x 5-in square post . Supports loads up to 5,000 lb., 4,781 lb. of pull-off force and 1,641 lb. of side thrust. It's an excellent and cost-effective replacement to concrete sonotubes. Buried more than 42 in in the ground, below freezing depth. Resistant, sturdy and easy to install. Baked powder coating finish provides excellent resistance to rust.
Pylex
1001017964
CAD81.992024-02-27
The Home Depot Canada
Commercial 66 Foundation Screw is rated 3.8 out of 5 by 183.
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from After 2 years, still impressed I think most of the bad reviews are from folks who didn't know how to properly install them. Which should be a bad review for their instructions... You don't screw these into the ground using the nut!! You remove the nut, then put the top bracket back on and slide it down until the square base of the bracket lines up with the square top part of the pole. THEN you use a 2x4 or 4x4 to screw them into the ground. Nothing will break or fail if you do it this way. Once you're done, remove the bracket (might need a little knock of a hammer) place the nut back onto the threaded part and you're ready to go! I have clay and my deck hasn't moved a cm since install.
Date published: 2017-03-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worked perfectly! I felt compelled to try and boost the score of this product after it saved me at least a day's work (compared to pouring concrete). I installed 4 of these in my back yard this weekend and now have a deck sitting on top of them. The key to these is you need to know what kind of material is under ground. If you have sand and clay like me, they go in ridiculously easy. If you live on rocky terrain these will not work.
Date published: 2015-05-19
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Use Cement and a Power Auger Instead!!!!! Terrible especially if you are using pressure treated lumber. I installed a fence last year and had several post twist over the winter. Cement would have help them straight. They are almost impossible to put in straight and level if you hit any rock or hard clay. The soil becomes disturb and loses strength. Lining up the posts is also difficult. I still had to cement some of the posts in. Furthermore they don't support weight. I had to replace the posts and use cement to hang fence gates. There is still a lot of play due to the brackets. Save time, money, effort and build a better fence using cement. I thought these would be great after friends have had similar products used for deck posts. Wish I could still return the ones I had to pull out.
Date published: 2020-05-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great product I used them for footings for concrete steps and it saved me time, digging and money! I used a 3/4 inch ratchet with a 1 inch adapter and they went in no problem in hard clay. If you read the instructions it says to remove set screw, throw away, remove nut, slide the saddle back over post and use 4x4 to install. Put nut back on and adjust your height. I'm ordering more to do a deck.
Date published: 2016-07-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heavy duty, great product I used this for foundation footings for a cedar pergola on my existing patio. Only had to remove 4, 8"x8" sections of interlock an screw them in using a 2x6 12' long. These things are solid, way better and cleaner than sonotubes and mixing concrete.
Date published: 2018-01-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from WORTH IT !!! Just like this other guy , I've used those screw piles for my deck and it's really a great product ! Go on the company website to look at installation videos and other nice infos !! Thank you
Date published: 2015-08-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic I used these for a fence I bought 28 of them and while they are not easy to put in (you need to dig approx.2ft and get larger rocks out the way) it sure beats digging a hole, using sono tubes, mixing the concrete, pouring concrete, and then waiting a day for it to set. Your posts never touch the ground so there can be no rot. You can level them with the bolts after the post goes in so if the Pylex doesn't go into the ground level its no big deal. They look very nice as well, color is black which it doesn't show from the pic. The way they bite in I am confident they are stronger than concrete which can heave with frost (I can say say that because my old post with concrete popped out of the ground like butter with my farm jack, I tried to use the farm jack on one of these and it just started bending the jack. I would use them again 100%.... expensive but if you factor in your time mixing concrete I would say it is a time/money saver. I have never written a review previously but felt I needed to with this product as even the people at home depot couldn't tell me if they were good for what I needed to do, they are not good they are excellent!
Date published: 2017-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Goodbye Sonotubes! The sliced bread of support posts! 1. FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS!!! The thumb screw and bolt is removed before trying to put it in the ground! Literally written on the post. 2. Put down rebar first. Way easier than moving the post. Takes the stress out of everything. 3. If you hit a rock when putting in the post, after you got the rebar in, back off a hair and hit the post a few times with a maul. It will push it down enough to bypass what stopped you. 4. Put double lateral stabilizers in the four corners only. 5. Celebrate all the time and money you saved using these posts. Bonus Tip. If you are using triple beams instead of double talk to the pro desk at Home Depot. They can swap out the top 4x4 holder for a 6x6 holder. That easy!
Date published: 2019-08-03
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Can these be used for a deck that is 3ft above ground at house with a gradual grade down to 5-6ft at the end? Also, how far down should they go in Sandy/Clay ground?

Asked by: Mike
You could use them for that kind of purpose. You would just need to make your posts longer. I would recommend going with the 6x6 bracket for posts that long rather than the included 4x4 bracket. However, our experience was that they would not turn in to the clay. Once we hit clay, they just spun and spun without biting into it. We put almost 400 lbs of weight on them and they still did not bite into the clay. We abandoned them, rented a gas-powered auger and poured concrete piles instead.
Answered by: Robbie Springer
Date published: 2023-01-12

What type of impact driver is strong enough to drill the screws? I have an area with nearly zero clearance. Thank you

Asked by: joeo
I did not use an impact driver, for the tight areas I fabricated a tool that would fit into the top of anchor and used a 3/4 inch ratchet driver with a Snipe.
Answered by: Papa
Date published: 2022-05-17

The earth behind my house was previously excavated down to the clay (15') as part of a decontamination project, and replaced with landscaping sand that has been compacted as per local codes.  Will this product work in compacted sand (for wood deck).

Asked by: rhoge
I chose the '66' because of space constraints and the 5000 lb up/down load bearing. The vertical flutes provide ~ 1500 lb of side load carrying in a 10" diameter by 2 foot deep pilot hole that the '66' is then rotated into forming the last ~ 2.5' portion as a small self forming threaded hole.... Make certain you dig the pilot hole large enough and deep enough to fit the entire depth of the flutes and use a small SDS or SDS plus hammer and bit to drive a 4' length of rebar to guide the '66' straight up/down into the ground. The '66' center is a pipe that the rebar fits into as a guide to ensure a plumb set. The small hand held SDS/ SDS Plus drivers can be rented at HD and when used in combination with a 2' level ensures your install goes in plumb with little effort. (Tell the rental person you need the driver and bit setup to drive a 1/2" diameter bond rod and that will work on the 1/2" rebar.) Based upon your description; the soil is all compacted sand down to a depth of 15'. If so, I believe you will have no issues using the 66 Commercial foundation screw for a deck provided you do not have erosion problems and are able to dig the pilot hole deep enough without the sand falling back in the holes? I have pasted in some basics of foundation soil condition considerations below and a "no clay" situation is ideal for driving the '66' in the ground as you will not have to worry about debris or clay stalling. Sand and gravels are generally better for load bearing; 2000 lb per square foot load bearing minimum vs. 1500 for silts and clays.
Answered by: DIYRR
Date published: 2020-04-22

Do these provide any uplift resistance? Looking to build a gazebo.

Asked by: Jon york
They will not rise since the auger Plate is below the frost line.  But it is possible for extreme wind to lift the structure since the mount bracket bar simply rests inside the pipe.  I would recommend anchoring your gazebo to the ground if you are concerned about wind.
Answered by: Kenstand
Date published: 2023-09-04

Can I use these for pergola posts which will also support a deck? Two posts will be about 2' away from my house foundation, will this screw be acceptable? Also, can these be used for a deck that is connected to the house or should it be floating/separate?

Asked by: Brad K
I found these very secure. Had a boat house on Lake Huron. These posts were the only thing remaining after going through twelve foot waves. Would be good for for your application. Does not need to be floating
Answered by: Graemexx
Date published: 2020-10-16

Has anyone used these for fence if so how does it hold up? and also how is the install in clay ground?

Asked by: Ryan
Yes - we are using this to hold up our mini library. It was very easy to install and is holding up about 50lbs of weight and hasn't shifted.
Answered by: Daniel
Date published: 2022-10-23

Can I use these for a 12x 20 extension bedroom on my home?

Asked by: Fred
Very strong BUT need to clear with local building codes. I used mine on 12 x 24 deck but no codes needed. Still strong.
Answered by: Rocksolid
Date published: 2023-06-03

i am planning an addition at a beach house and do not know how deep the sand goes can i use this foundation screw as a foundation and how far apart and how deep?

Asked by: johnv
There are instructions with it. It explains how to set the foundation screw in to test, put a block of wood on top (to protect the hardware), and hammer with a sledge a few times and see if the screw sank down more than an inch or so. If it did, you should keep screwing it in and try again until it doesn't move much when hammered. Then you're all set and know the post won't sink much when you put a load on it. Spacing depends on the load bearing of your floor joists / sill beam combo. Something like every 6' - 8' between posts would work for a properly sized sill beam holding up a one-story addition I imagine, but check with your local codes or expertise.
Answered by: Crash
Date published: 2021-01-27
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