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    Rheem EcoSense 1.5 LPM Tankless Water Heater

    Model # CECO180DVLN|Store SKU # 1000664604

    Overview
    Specifications
    Reviews

    Overview

    Model # CECO180DVLN Store SKU # 1000664604

    CECO180 DVLN water heaters provides all the hot water you'll ever need for 2 - 3 bathroom homes. Next Generation Burner Technology. 0.26 GPM Minimum Flow Rate, .40 GPM Minimum Activation Flow Rate. UMC-117 remote control and 10 ft. of thermostat wire is included. High-altitude capability up to 9,840 ft. elevation above sea level (no chip required). Guardian OFWTM overheat film wrap. Use RTG-20147 3 inch /5 inch Concentric Vent System with Integrated Condensate Collector.

    1. Continuous Hot Water! Enviormentally freindly on demand water heater.
    1. EcoOptions .
    1. 4.3 gallons of 120 degree hot water per minute at a 77 degree temp. rise.7.4 gallons of 120 degree water per minute at a 45 degree temp. Rise.
    1. Cold water sandwich elimination with exclusive idle mode
    1. 3"/5" concentric vent kit available for up and out installations with part # RTG20147
    1. Natural Gas Model. energy efficient

    Specifications

    Dimensions

    Assembled Depth (in inches)
    9
    Assembled Height (in inches)
    31
    Assembled Weight (in lbs)
    42
    Assembled Width (in inches)
    15
    Packaged Depth (in inches)
    15
    Packaged Height (in inches)
    33
    Packaged Weight (In lbs)
    54
    Packaged Width (in inches)
    18

    Details

    Certified
    Yes
    Country of Origin
    JP-Japan
    Parts Warranty (Years)
    5

    Warranty / Certifications

    12 year Heat exchanger, 5 year parts and 1 year labour
    1.5 LPM Tankless Water HeaterPhoto of productCECO180 DVLN water heaters provides all the hot water you'll ever need for 2 - 3 bathroom homes. Next Generation Burner Technology. 0.26 GPM Minimum Flow Rate, .40 GPM Minimum Activation Flow Rate. UMC-117 remote control and 10 ft. of thermostat wire is included. High-altitude capability up to 9,840 ft. elevation above sea level (no chip required). Guardian OFWTM overheat film wrap. Use RTG-20147 3 inch /5 inch Concentric Vent System with Integrated Condensate Collector.
    Rheem EcoSense
    1000664604
    CAD999
    The Home Depot Canada
    1.5 LPM Tankless Water Heater is rated 3.6 out of 5 by 8.
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    Rated 5 out of 5 by from 3 Years and still going strong Bought this a few years back and it's been a very dependable unit. Once every year I clean the burner and flame rods and it's good to go. I suspect most people that have issues didn't install their unit properly, have poor quality water (I added a water softener and filter setup) or don't clean or maintain their system properly.
    Date published: 2016-07-01
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from Junk Stay clear of Rheem product Went through 2 of these units in 6 years, after the 1st, 3 years water leak Rheem provided a replacement to a new improved version. RTG 95. This unit failed as well after 3 years and 6 months. water leak in the heat exchanger. Rheem refused to provide any type of warranty. Would not even do good will. Made every excuse that it was my fault. Rheem mangament was terrible to deal with and rude. They also had no idea that I have a good working knowledge on this product type. Do your homework. talk with your installer.
    Date published: 2016-01-29
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Rheem Eco Sense - It rocks After extensive research and debating, I picked up this unit before Christmas with the 10% off Home Depot card promotion for purchases over $499 or more. I just got the tank installed this past weekend and I am delighted at the performance of the tank. I had to upgrade my copper plumbing to 3/4 inch and tie back into the 1/2 inch copper of existing pipes that were connected to my old rental water tank. For the hot water suppy line exiting the tank, I ran the 3/4 inch pipe about 36 inches out and then reduced back down to 1/2 inch. I've read where there are water flow/pressure problems and I can assure you that even with two showers going at the same time this tankless performs without a hitch. Some people also complain that the hot water takes forever to reach the bathrooms as compared to a water tank. My observation is that it may take about 15 seconds longer for the water to reach the upstairs showers. The hot water has to run through 100 feet of copper pipe before it reaches the shower, so of course it's going to take time to get there. I also insulated all the hot water pipes and the cold supply line to the tankless heater in hopes of making the system more efficient. This unit is very quiet and compared to the rheem power vent gas heater that used to whine each and every hour, I'm loving the performance of this. Also note with the Metal fab vent kit which is used in Canada the elbow must be used first. The kit only has three pieces plus some extra piece that is not needed on this version of the heater. This means that the tankless heater it mounted very high on the wall. You also need a 6 inch hole saw to drill the opening to the outside. As for the water service valves which were $110 CDN dollars, I passed on this and made my own service valves with two ball valves and some t fittings for less than half the price. Also note that for the condensation drain fitting you need to use a rubber hose with an inside diameter of 5/8 inches along with purchasing a 1 inch hose clamp to fasten it in place. I will report back once I get my utility bill to see how much less gas I am using with the tankless. I'm very happy so far and I'm glad to have gotten rid of my rental water tank!
    Date published: 2012-01-12
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from using ECO 180 tankless with 2 showers , 1/2" line I did a review after the initial install and have since done more tests to confirm that the system works well if plumbed in to have a plentiful water supply to the heater inlet and when using low flow shower heads with two showers. If you have water line restrictions that starve the heater of incoming water and have high flow showers, there could be problems as mentioned by one installer where the heater would overheat and temporarily shut down. After hearing about his experiences, I question if his heater was starved for water. To analyze this , I measured water pressure to the heater with one and two showers running along with gas and water flow. To ensure that the heater gets enough water coming in, I have a 60 ga water tank modified to have a 4" air cushion on top with a direct 3/4" water line from the tank to the heater. I also ensured that there were no extra valves or fittings to slow the water coming into the tank. Water pressure was 68psi with no flow, 62psi with one 2GPM shower on , 57 with one 2.5GPM shower on and 46psi with both showers on full hot. It showed that there was still adequate pressure to fill the heater even at full flow. BTU usage (measured by watching the gas meter dial with a stopwatch) was 63900BTU with one 2 GPM shower, 85200 BTU with one 2.5GPM shower and 116200 BTU with both showers on but at an approximately 20% lower line pressure, 20% slower flow rate and correspondingly 20% lower total BTU usage. The flow was still adequate for showering. With a 180000 BTU input capacity on the heater , that means the heater was only running at 2/3 of capacity to run two low flow showers. If I open more taps, the 1/2" incoming line would be a limiting factor causing the incoming pressure to decrease more and the flow per nozzle would go down proportionately. That says that the 180000BTU has spare capacity with using a 1/2" line and some reserve to deal with colder winter water. The incoming cold water was 52F and 58F coming out of my 60 Gal storage tank to feed the heater. The heater was set at 116F which is fine with family members. The water temp at the shower was measured at 116F . The testing was done on full hot with no cold water mixed at the nozzle. There have not been any problems with the heater overheating and cutting out. If anyone is experiencing that problem, I suggest adding a tee in the inlet line to the heater to measure the water pressure going into the heater to check for water starvation/very low pressure during heavy water demand and also check for high flow shower heads that drop the water pressure too much. If the heater cannot get water coming into it fast enough to keep up with the outflow and the pressure drops too low , it makes sense that it could cavitate (create bubble pockets inside) and overheat. I would be concerned about premature lime buildup if high local internal temperatures occurred with low inlet water pressure/cavitation. It is easy and cheap to add a pressure guage on the inlet side to check that your plumbing system is supplying reasonable water pressure to the inlet side of the heater when you have a lot of outflow. Having an air cushion tank, in the inlet side reduces the risk of a temporary shortage of water flow into the heater at the instant a large tap is turned on. I also checked the electricity usage. It is minimal - only 45 watts when the fan is running and about 2 watts when on standby. I am very pleased with the unit . If you are careful with the plumbing layout and avoid the temptation to install a Niagara Falls shower head or other high flow items,it should work well for you too. A valve can be added before any highflow item to throttle it back a bit to keep pressure reasonable in the rest of the system and most importantly the heater. I hope that this is helpful for the do-it-yourselfer or for the person who is researching and designing the system into an older home with 1/2" incoming water lines.
    Date published: 2011-05-09
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good supply of hot water -installation tips I had a good electric tank but calculated that even when using a timer to only heat water during off-peak periods, my cost would be about 1/3 if I used gas. Challenges- only a 1/2" water supply line to the house, it was hard to find a location for the exhaust to be 3 ft from other openings etc as required by gas code (see guide from Union gas) and also be close to a 3/4" gas line and the water lines. I wanted to minimize water line distance and elbows and tee into a centrally located 1/2" hot line from a 3/4" line from the heater. I did not want to install an additional surge tank. After a couple of days of measuring and planning, I found a workable location but clearances were close to make it a neat installation. To provide a cushion for pressure and supply a strong flow out of a small 1/2" line from the street to avoid shortages as the washing machine or dishwasher would turn on , I modified the "hot" pipe coming from the hot water tank by extending the pick up point down 4" to provide an air pocket. I used 3/4" line from the old tank to the heater and used minimal elbows . To extend tank life, I plan to replace the anode which is 2/3 gone. Spend extra time planning and do only what you can competently do and get a fitter to install the gas or at least inspect and tag for safety and insurance. The install and startup went well. The unit works well. With one 2.5GPM shower, the unit consumes about 1 cubic meter of gas in 15 minutes ,running at about 40000BTU/hr so with 180000BTU rating, it has probably had capacity for more than my 1/2 water line can supply. I set the temp to 120 max hoping to minimize lime buildup in the future. I prefer to run the tap in longer runs to fill a sink rather than make the unit stop and stop with many short 1 second openings of the tap (for longer switch and ignitor life). The unit lets a 1/8" stream of water flow without turning on the heater and turns on when the water stream is about 1/4" which is fine and doesn't waste heat if someone leaves a tap dripping. It takes a few seconds to reach far parts of the home but acceptable. If gas prices jump higher than electric or if there is a problem with the gas unit, I can close one valve and open another and turn on the electric heater. Having the air cushion in the top of the water tank allows the water to continue to flow out about 10 or 20 litres under pressure after I turn off the main water valve to the house which stops the abrupt shocks when valves open and close. I installed a permanent pressure guage at the tank to check for flow problems and pressure holds fairly constant which is good. The surface of the unit and the vent pipe stay surprising cool. It seems that the unit is efficient . I am pleased with the unit. So are others in the family, some of whom tend to enjoy a long shower. Now I don't feel badly if they are not fast showering knowing that the incremental cost is less. To partly hide and protect the pipes under the tank , I neatly formed some 16 ga painted sheet metal covers and fastened them to the wall. I would not recommend that anyone other than an advanced/experienced handyman do the full project. However even a novice can research and do careful thinking and planning. The routing of pipes , and water flows ,vent and future potential gas appliances is a key factor in making the install flow smoothly and likely work well into the future.
    Date published: 2011-05-04
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Part 1 After much research, I took the plunge Research - I went out and got quotes from contractors to compare models, prices, energy ratings.... Having one of these installed can be very expensive. After reading reviews on the Rheem model, I concluded that most of the negative reviews were from installation mistakes. This model isn't the most efficient model, but I would say it is the most economical model due to its purchase price. Installation planning - You'll need to check out a few things: 1-do you have enough BTU/Hr capacity in your main gas line? The instructions say you'll need a 3/4" gas line into the unit, but keep in mind other gas appliances in your home. There were plenty of confusing websites out there, best to try and get an answer from some gas fitter. 2-Plan out where you are going to place the unit and be sure that you can legally vent it outside, there are lots of restrictions with windows, pathways etc.... You'll also need to know if you are going to need extra Venting besides just going out a wall behind the unit, you'll need to order this from the special order desk, and it could take a few weeks to come in. 3-You'll need to make sure that your plumbing is done right, all 3/4" from the unit out, without being restricted by 1/2" until the last run. Unless you have very little plumbing in your home :) . So I spent 2 weeks planning out where to put my unit, getting supplies I knew I would need. I had time off so I decided to take the plunge and get it done. Installation - Because I'm not a HVAC contractor, I don't have a truck full of parts, but I'm 10 minutes away from a Home Depot, so..... on day 1, I spent about 5 hours driving around.... Copper, pipe, 90's, Tee's, black iron pipe..... and apparently someone in my city was going around and buying all the 3/4" Black Iron Union's up... I went to both H.D.'s, and 2 other competitors and finally they had one. Besides finding parts, the installation went well. Some warnings: Plumbing - If you're pretty handy you'll be able to handle this. Gas - If you are at all not comfortable running gas do not attempt this part, call a HVAC contractor or a qualified pipe fitter. Venting - be sure to follow the instructions, you can download them online before you purchase to see what is required, and if you'll need any extra pieces. I would rate this installation as advanced. Not for your average DIY guy/gal. Unit Operation - :) I like the tankless unit.... It takes 10 or so seconds longer to get the hot water compared to our old tank unit. I was worried about the units ability to produce a warm shower.... at 120 degrees, it was very close to what we had our tank set to... very hot, I couldn't have only hot water running. Now this has only been running for 2 days so far, I'm going to write another review in a couple of weeks. I'd like to try running two showers at the same time and see how the heater keeps up. I can say that we never used to have 2 showers at the same time because the fact the water would run out so quick.
    Date published: 2010-12-24
    Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not really "On Demand" We replaced our electric tank with this unit a month ago, and while I am pleased with the savings on my electricity usage, I am surprised at the drawbacks: - The installer installed it at 120 degrees. If we want to increase the temperature we actually have to have the unit adapted by the installer again! This despite the so-called remote temperature control. - I would hardly call it "on demand" . My kitchen sink is 6 feet from the unit and I have to turn on the hot water for at least a full minute before its hot. You can't tell me that its because of the cold water in the pipes! It may be from the anti-scald mechanism that's built in. We may be saving on our electricity but I bet our water bill will go up! I would consider if there are other models to choose from and see if there are stated times for water to actually heat up.
    Date published: 2010-11-14
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from Tankless water heater In trying to install my recently purchased water heater I found I required additional venting in order to pass code. Home depot does not stock or sell this product.
    Date published: 2010-05-27
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    Currently heat my garage & basement + hot water for my residence with a 40 gallon gas hot H2O tank. would a boiler be more efficiant?

    Asked by: Anonymous
    It may be. Boilers and Tankless water heaters only use energy when heating. When there is no call for hot water they are off. The concern would be the cost to install vs. the payback time.
    Answered by: TheRheemExpert
    Date published: 2016-05-14

    How long do u need to run the water before it gets hot?

    Asked by: Anonymous
    That question has many answers. When you first turn a tap on there is always cold water in the line. The unit itself takes a few seconds to turn on (fire up). So it may take few few seconds to 25 seconds to get hot water. When the unit has been running there is an idel mode to help eliminate the "cold water sandwich". This idel mode is 5 minutes to it will not need to fire up. Depending on the faucet you may have hot water right a way of it may take a few seconds to purge a line of cold water. Please remember these are tankless water heaters not instantanious water heaters (all manuafacturers only sell tankless water heaters).
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2013-10-23

    where is this item manufactured?

    Asked by: Anonymous
    The units are manufactured in Japan. We have been making tankless water heaters there for almost 70 years!!
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2013-10-23

    i need an electric tankless water heater do you have any at the store

    Asked by: Anonymous
    Home Depot does not currently stock an electric tankless water heater. Electric versions are not very productive due to the large electrical load required and low production due to colder water temperatures. You may be able to special order one if required.
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2016-03-01

    Would a tank-less heater work in a cottage that draws its water from the lake?

    We currently have an electric hot water tank that needs to be changed.
    Asked by: Anonymous
    Yes it would work. A water softener may be required due to the hardness of the water.
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2013-10-23

    Does the vent kit work on both Natural Gas as Well as Propane?

    Asked by: Anonymous
    Yes the vent kit is the same for either model. It is also required on either model.
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2013-10-23

    looking for online manual.

    i can't seem to find a manual for this unit.
    Asked by: Anonymous
    You can go to Rheem.com and look under condensing tankless products. The manual is the same as the EcoSense version.
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2013-10-23

    Can you use this unit with manitobas wells? I know well water is very cold and would you need the softener installed before the heater?

    Asked by: Anonymous
    Tankless units are capable of heating well water. The water conditions will directly affect the amount of required maintenance (increase). A softener may be required depending on the hardness of the water. The colder the water the less hot water production per minute you will get in the home.
    Answered by: RheemExpert
    Date published: 2017-01-27
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